The origin and history of the violin

The wood of the ebony comes from Africa — it is wood of the date palm. This is accomplished with a heavy stroke, typically quite near the heel, and quite loud. The most famous violin maker is the 'Golden Age' luthier Antonio Stradivari, whose violins now sell for millions of dollars.

It is unknown exactly when and by whom these changes were initially made. In the s and s, some orchestras performing Baroque music such as the Freiburg Baroque Orchestra have had all of their violins and violas, solo and ensemble, perform standing up.

Over the centuries that followed, Europe continued to have two distinct types of bowed instruments: The lack of frets allows for the production of a warmer, more vibrant tone, as well as making it possible to play precisely in tune in all keys. Nonetheless, intervals of tenths or even more are sometimes required to be double-stopped in advanced playing, resulting in a very stretched left-hand position with both fingers extended.

In addition during the whole process of later working by the violin maker, this negative influence cannot be corrected.

History of the violin

Very high positions are a particular technical challenge, for two reasons. It is thought that perhaps Andrea Amati did not create the first modern violin, and that it was instead created in Brescia earlier in the 16th century.

The History of the Violin

A "triple stop" with three simultaneous notes is possible in some circumstances. Double-stops can be indicated in any position, though the widest interval that can be double-stopped naturally in one position is an octave with the first finger on the lower string and the fourth finger on the higher string.

This history of the violin is inferred from paintings from this era that feature violins. The stencils can be taken from an instrument, so for instance from a violin made by Stradivari or Guarneri; perhaps, they are changed a little bit with a small, personal peculiarity.

The two earliest violin makers in recorded history are both from northern Italy: Why this should have occurred is a matter of conjecture. A soft varnish and an insufficient undercoating have a tendency to deaden heavily the sound of a violin.

This is more often seen in folk traditions than in classical music. The fingers are conventionally numbered 1 index through 4 little finger in music notationsuch as sheet music and etude books. Double stops in orchestra are divided between the players if they are not at ease with them, with half of the musicians playing the lower note and the other half playing the higher note.

The History of the Violin

But how did this fortunate circumstance come about? If the "A" is in tune, the "A" and the open D string should produce a harmonious perfect fourth.

WHY NOT LEARN TO PLAY THE VIOLIN?

Early history[ edit ] The Persian geographer Ibn Khurradadhbih d. The violin has ultimately evolved to be a very versatile instrument, and a violinist now has numerous career options and genres to explore.

The name luthier, as applied to stringed instrument makers reflects their earlier role as lute makers and repairers.

Music for Kids History of the Violin The modern day style violin was first made near the start of the European Renaissance in the s. The earliest documentary evidence for a violin is in the records of the treasury of Savoy, which paid for "trompettes et vyollons de Verceil", that is to say, "trumpets and violins from Vercelli ", the town where Ferrari painted his Madonna of the Orange Tree.

Prior to that there had been other stringed instruments that used a bow to vibrate the strings such as the lyra and the rebec from the middle ages. There are notes of higher pitch beyond those indicated. Double stops in orchestra are divided between the players if they are not at ease with them, with half of the musicians playing the lower note and the other half playing the higher note.

Therefore, nothing except the ribs is bent or pressed, everything is worked out of a solid piece of wood. In the classical tradition, violinists will often use a string crossing or shift of position to allow them to avoid the change of timbre introduced by an open string.

We can be sure that, at the outset, the violin played the same sort of role as older popular instruments such as the earlier-mentioned rebec: A violin crafted by Antonio Stradivari Changing of the Violin Over the years the violin has gone through changes of design to end up with the current construction and dimensions.

As the violin has no frets to stop the strings, as is usual with the guitarthe player must know exactly where to place the fingers on the strings to play with good intonation tuning. A note played outside of the normal compass of a position, without any shift, is referred to as an extension.

Moving the hand up the neck, so the first finger takes the place of the second finger, brings the player into second position. In such positions, the thumb is often thought of as an 'anchor' whose location defines what position the player is in.The History of the Violin.

Although it is believed that the Italian luthier Andrea Amati created the modern violin family around the yearbowed stringed instruments were invented long before this date. The History of the Violin. Although it is believed that the Italian luthier Andrea Amati created the modern violin family around the yearbowed stringed instruments were invented long before this date.

Violin definition, the treble instrument of the family of modern bowed instruments, held nearly horizontal by the player's arm with the lower part supported against the collarbone or shoulder.

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The violin bow: a brief depiction of its history

Nov 16,  · A Brief History of the Violin Victor Fernandez. Loading Unsubscribe from Victor Fernandez? History of Violin (THE INSTRUMENTALS - Episode 7) - Duration: History of the Violin The modern day style violin was first made near the start of the European Renaissance in the s.

Prior to that there had been other stringed instruments that used a bow to vibrate the strings such. The History of the Violin by William Bartruff, Violin Maker Foreword. There are stringed instruments from many different cultures and times that each, indirectly or directly, have had a part in the development of the instrument now known as the violin.

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The origin and history of the violin
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